Do you have questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine?

If you are on treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) and have questions about COVID-19 or the COVID-19 vaccines, contact your healthcare provider for answers and guidance. It is very important to continue taking your MS medicine as prescribed and to follow your healthcare provider’s treatment directions.

For additional information, there are helpful online resources that address the question of whether people with MS should get a COVID-19 vaccine, including the National MS Society and the The Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers. To learn more about your vaccination options, talk with your healthcare provider.

US-REB-00324 04/2021

LOOK BACK, THEN MOVE FORWARD

Join us as we celebrate 20 years of Rebif—to which every patient and partner has contributed along the way.

2002: Rebif® Approved!

Since its approval by the Food and Drug Administration on March 7, 2002, Rebif has made its mark on the relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS) community.

Together, we are making a difference.

2002

MS LifeLines Launched

This patient support program included a call center available to patients 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.

EVIDENCE study results published

The EVidence of Interferon Dose-response: European North American Comparative Efficacy (EVIDENCE) study was a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial that compared the efficacy and safety of Rebif to that of Avonex®.

2004

Rebiject® launched

 

The first-generation Rebiject gave patients and healthcare providers the option to choose an autoinjector administration.

 

2005

10k+ prescriptions since approval

Rebif pregnancy registry established

The registry was established to gather important safety data on Rebif and family planning. Rebif is not indicated for use during pregnancy.

2007

MS LifeLines Access Made Simple

The goal of this program was to provide simplified and affordable access to Rebif.

 

 

MS LifeLines continues to offer support today

Find out more about the dedicated on-call specialists who are available to you.

Call 1-877-447-3243 from 8 AM to 8 PM ET,
Monday through Friday or 9 AM to 5 PM ET, Saturday.

2008

50k+ prescriptions since approval

REGARD study results published

The Rebif vs glatiramer acetate in relapsing MS (REGARD) study was a multicenter, randomized, parallel, and open-label trial.

2010

1 Million+ MS LifeLine calls

On July 10, 2010, the Patient Services team answered their millionth call.

75K+ prescriptions since approval

2011

PRISMS-15 study completed

This 15-year follow-up study was pursued in order to understand the long-term outcomes of treatment with Rebif, and as part of an ongoing commitment to excellence in patient care.

2012

REFLEX study results published

The primary objective of the Rebif FLEXible Dosing in Early MS (REFLEX) study was to evaluate the effect of Rebif in patients with early disease.

100K+ prescriptions since approval

2013

Rebidose® launched

A single-use auto-injector for the self-administration of Rebif, Rebidose was created to help patients meet their injection needs.

2016

125K+ prescriptions since approval

2017

120,000 nurse visits completed

The commitment to patients of MS LifeLines continues unabated as they reach this impressive milestone of service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

52M+ doses of Rebif administered

2020

Label updated with information about pregnancy and lactation

The FDA approved the addition of information about pregnancy and lactation to help inform treatment decisions.

2022

150K+ prescriptions since approval

2002

MS LifeLines launched

This patient support program included a call center available to patients 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.

EVIDENCE study results published

The EVidence of Interferon Dose-response: European North American Comparative Efficacy (EVIDENCE) study was a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial that compared the efficacy and safety of Rebif to that of Avonex®.

2007

MS LifeLines Access Made Simple

The goal of this program was to provide simplified and affordable access to Rebif.

 

 

MS LifeLines continues to offer support today

Find out more about the dedicated on-call specialists who are available to you.

Call 1-877-447-3243 from 8 AM to 8 PM ET,
Monday through Friday or 9 AM to 5 PM ET, Saturday.

2010

1 million+ MS LifeLine calls

On July 10, 2010, the Patient Services team answered their millionth call.

75K+ prescriptions since approval

2012

REFLEX study results published

The primary objective of the Rebif FLEXible Dosing in Early MS (REFLEX) study was to evaluate the effect of Rebif in patients with early disease.

100K+ prescriptions since approval

 

 

 

2017

120,000 nurse visits completed

The commitment to patients of MS LifeLines continues unabated as they reach this impressive milestone of service.

52M+ doses of Rebif administered

2022

150K+ prescriptions since approval

Together, we are changing what’s possible in our community. Thank you for the part you’ve played in our 20 years of impact, and for inspiring us to keep our story going and growing.


IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATION

Important Safety Information

Do not take Rebif if you are allergic to interferon beta, human albumin, or any of the ingredients in Rebif.

Rebif can cause serious side effects. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the symptoms listed below while taking Rebif.

  • Behavioral health problems including depression and suicidal thoughts. You may have mood problems including depression (feeling hopeless or feeling bad about yourself), and thoughts of hurting yourself or suicide.
  • Liver problems or worsening of liver problems including liver failure. Symptoms may include nausea, loss of appetite, tiredness, dark colored urine and pale stools, yellowing of your skin or the white part of your eye, bleeding more easily than normal, confusion, and sleepiness. During your treatment with Rebif you will need to see your healthcare provider regularly and have regular blood tests to check for side effects.
  • Serious allergic and skin reactions. Symptoms may include itching, swelling of your face, eyes, lips, tongue or throat, trouble breathing, anxiousness, feeling faint, skin rash, hives, sores in your mouth, or skin blisters and peels.
  • Injection site problems. Rebif may cause redness, pain, itching or swelling at the place where your injection was given. Call your healthcare provider right away if an injection site becomes swollen and painful or the area looks infected. You may have a skin infection or an area of severe skin damage (necrosis) requiring treatment by a healthcare provider.
  • Blood problems. Rebif can affect your bone marrow and cause low red and white blood cell and platelet counts. In some people, these blood cell counts may fall to dangerously low levels. If your blood cell counts become very low, you can get infections and problems with bleeding and bruising. Your healthcare provider may ask you to have regular blood tests to check for blood problems.
  • Seizures. Some people have had seizures while taking Rebif.

Before you take Rebif, tell your healthcare provider if you have or have had any of the following conditions:

  • mental illness, including depression and suicidal behavior
  • liver problems
  • bleeding problems or blood clots
  • low blood cell counts
  • seizures (epilepsy)
  • thyroid problems
  • you drink alcohol
  • you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Rebif will harm your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider if you become pregnant during your treatment with Rebif
  • you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Rebif passes into your breast milk. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will use Rebif or breastfeed. You should not do both

Tell your healthcare provider about all medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements.

The most common side effects of Rebif include:

  • flu-like symptoms. You may have flu-like symptoms when you first start taking Rebif. You may be able to manage these flu-like symptoms by taking over-the-counter pain and fever reducers. For many people, these symptoms lessen or go away over time. Symptoms may include muscle aches, fever, tiredness, and chills
  • stomach pain
  • change in liver blood tests

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of Rebif. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Indication

Rebif® (interferon beta-1a) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults. It is not known if Rebif is safe and effective in children.

Please see Rebif® Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.